The details of the events of the crossing of the potomac army to rappahannock

McClellanthe victor in several small but well-publicized actions in western Virginia. That command would retain its name until Junewhen it was re-christened the Army of Northern Virginia. The men were efficiently organized, thoroughly trained, and well armed and equipped.

The details of the events of the crossing of the potomac army to rappahannock

August 31, — General Robert E. Lee attended a conference with President Jefferson Davis at Richmond to discuss upcoming Confederate strategy in Virginia and elsewhere. Both armies were roughly where they had begun the Gettysburg campaign, with Federals occupying the area where Thomas J.

The forces remained stationary for the time being, except for sporadic skirmishes and raids. On the 6th, John S. Mosby and his Confederate partisans captured a Federal wagon train at Fairfax Court House, making off with the supplies without a Federal pursuit.

However, the men lacked necessities such as food and shoes, and horses lacked grain and equipment. Disrupted rail lines affected the delivery of what little supplies could be gathered.

And across the Mississippi, Federals were poised to capture Little Rock and threaten the Texas coast. I suggested that he should adhere to his defensive tactics upon the Rapidan, and reinforce from his army the army lying in front of General William Rosecrans—so that it could crush that army, and then push on to the West.

Lee opposed both proposals, instead arguing that the best way to take Federal pressure off the threatened points was to go on the offensive against Meade. Gramercy Books, [ edition]p. Checkmark Books,p.

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10, facts, Fredericksburg, Burnside, Gibbon, Slaughter Pen, Marye's heights, Rappahannock, looting, river crossing, Pelham The Battle of Fredericksburg was arguably the largest battle of the war, and one of the most embarrassing Union defeats. General Burnside,with the Ninth Corps, was at the time the Army of the Potomac moved, left with the bulk of his corps at the crossing of the Rappahannock River and Alexandria railroad, holding the road back to Bull Run, with instructions not to move until he received notice that a crooking of the Rapidan was secured, but to move promptly as soon as such notice was received. The Army of the Potomac was the principal Union Army in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War. It was created in July shortly after the First Battle of Bull Run and was disbanded in May following the surrender of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in April.

Meade was dissuaded from attacking and General Robert E. Lee submitted his official report on the Battle of Gettysburg. Federal Maj Gen G. Meade and Confederate Gen R. He reported that he hadofficers and men, including about 13, cavalrymen, present for duty.

Lee had about 59, officers and men, including some 9, horsemen. This has shown by the feeble operations since. Hill, reported with 10, men, and that he intends to make a stand at Culpeper or in its vicinity. But now that Lee had reached Culpeper, President Abraham Lincoln no longer saw the need for Meade to immediately attack.

I am claiming no such thing of him. I have been acting under the belief, from your telegrams, that it was his and your wish that I should pursue Lee and bring him to a general engagement, if practicable.

More troops might be needed from the army if the northern draft riots got any worse, Halleck explained. To do so safely, Meade needed to secure the Rappahannock crossings in his front.

The War in Their Words: Campaign of the Two Dogs

Confederates patrolled the region between Rappahannock Station and Fredericksburg, guessing that if a Federal attack came, it would come from that area.

On the last day of July, Lee submitted his official report on the Battle of Gettysburg to Davis, reiterating that the soldiers were not responsible for the defeat: More may have been required of them than they were able to perform, but my admiration of their noble qualities and confidence in their ability to cope successfully with the enemy has suffered no abatement from the issue of this protracted and sanguinary conflict.

In various quarters there are mutterings of discontent, and threats of alienation are said to exist, with preparation for organized opposition.

I have felt more than ever before the want of your advice during the recent period of disaster. If a victim would secure the success of our cause I would freely offer myself.The presence of the Army of the Potomac east of the Blue Ridge Mountains meant that eastern crossings of the Potomac were protected.

On the whole, however, because the main theater of war in Virginia had shifted south after Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston withdrawal from Manassas Junction early in , the Potomac played little . Crossing the Rappahannock: This program will look at the dramatic events of December 11, , as the Union army struggled to get across the Rappahannock.

We will take the same view of the event as thousands of soldiers did, watching from the heights of Chatham, above the crossing. The Battle of Fredericksburg begins in and around Fredericksburg, Virginia, between General Robert E.

Lee's Confederate army of Northern Virginia and the northern army of Potomac, commanded by Major Gen.

The details of the events of the crossing of the potomac army to rappahannock

Ambrose Burnside. Across the Rappahannock - Bradley Finfrock. When the Army of the Potomac crossed the Rappahannock River in December , events transpired into bloody combat. The battle of Fredericksburg and what led up to it, and the nearly disastrous aftermath of the battle on Lincoln's administration, which faced U.S.

Senate efforts to usurp Lincoln's role as commander in chief, is the subject of the novel "The Wastage," by Dean Halliday Smith. 10, facts, Fredericksburg, Burnside, Gibbon, Slaughter Pen, Marye's heights, Rappahannock, looting, river crossing, Pelham The Battle of Fredericksburg was arguably the largest battle of the war, and one of the most embarrassing Union defeats.

Battle of Fredericksburg «